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Deities – Everything is Dual: All You Need to Know

The pre-Christian faiths of Europe are where paganism first emerged. Similar to other western nations where it has been increasing quickly since the 1950s, it is making a comeback worldwide. The pagan community values unity in diversity, which is reflected in the social infrastructure of paganism, which is made up of a network of related local organizations and traditions.

Pagans recognize that divinity may take on various forms, including goddesses and gods, and that deity is evident in nature. In paganism, goddess worship is central. The natural cycles of birth, development, and death that we experience in the world around us have significant spiritual significance in the eyes of Pagans, who view nature as sacred. Along with other animals, plants, trees, rocks, and other earthly objects, humans are considered to be a part of nature. The majority of pagan religions hold to some type of reincarnation, and death is seen as only a passage within an ongoing process of existence.

Wiccan God and Goddesses

The feminine and male manifestations of the Divine are the main deities in Wicca. These are the Horned God and the Triple Goddess. It’s a popular notion that Wiccans revere pagans, however, this is untrue. The Goddess and the God are seen by Wiccans as the two manifestations of the Divine. However, followers may undoubtedly cooperate with—rather than claim to “worship”—a wide range of deities from several mythologies and civilizations.

Wiccans can, however, invoke a plethora of different pagan deities in prayer and ritual, each with unique powers and energies. As a result, Wicca is frequently a polytheistic religion whose followers worship a number of deities, frequently from different pantheons (such as Greek, Egyptian, Celtic, etc.).

The majority of witches worship a moon goddess and a deity with horns. Wiccans who practice Dianic Wicca are the only ones who do not acknowledge both the goddess and the deity. They only acknowledge the goddess as existing. Some witches hold the god and the goddess to be on an equal footing. Other Wiccans, however, hold that the goddess is more significant than the god.

Polytheism: Pluralism and Diversity

The diversity of Nature is acknowledged by the numerous deities in pagan religions. Some Pagans consider the goddesses and gods to be a varied group of people, much like the human population of this globe. Others consider all goddesses as one Great Goddess and all gods as one Great God, whose peaceful interplay is the secret of the cosmos. Examples of these people include followers of Isis and Osiris from ancient times onward and Wiccan-based Pagans in the modern world.

Others, like many modern Hindu mystics and the emperor Julian, a major restorer of paganism in Christian antiquity, hold the abstract Supreme Principle to be the true source and beginning of all things. However, even the last remaining Pagans understand that other spiritual entities are themselves divine and are not made up of partial deities, despite the fact that they may share certain characteristics with a higher entity. Instead of being monotheists, who believe in a single real deity alongside which all other deities are false, pagans who worship the One are referred to be henotheists, believers in a supreme divine principle.

There are tens of thousands of distinct deities in the Universe, and the pantheon that your spiritual path is based on will frequently have a big impact on the ones you choose to worship. But many contemporary Wiccans and Pagans identify as eclectic, which means they could worship a goddess from one religion alongside a deity from another.

As you can see, paganism was the religion that helped to catapult Christianity and all other religions after, it is truly a nature-based and primarily peaceful practice. Blessed be until next time.

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